Books I Won’t Read After All

There are books which, at first, I’m certain that I want to read but that over time I end up losing interest in for a variety of reasons. Most of them I’ve never mentioned on this blog. Some I have, however, and it feels strange when I choose not to read them afterwards. For that reason, I decided to write a post about the books that I said that I was going to read a while back but that I won’t after all.

 

Murder on Christmas Eve: Classic Mysteries for the Festive Season

This book features ten classic murder mysteries by various authors. I mentioned it on a post I wrote more than a year and a half ago titled ‘Christmassy Books on My Wish List’. Since then I’ve read a couple of reviews that fully waned my desire to read it.

 

Sleeping Giants by Slyvain Neuvel

The main focus of this novel, the first in a series, is on the mystery surrounding a bizarre artefact. The physicist Rose Franklin is leading a team to secretly understand the code of a giant metal hand. The story is told through interviews, journal entries, transcripts and news articles. At first, I considered this type of storytelling fascinating. But I’m not that interested in it anymore. I said that I wanted to read it on a post about the book series that I had on my wish list. Continue reading

Graphic Novels, Comics and I

Many children and young adults seem to love comics and graphic novels. But I wasn’t much of a fan when I was younger. I recall buying Disney comics in the summer to read on the beach and almost always never finishing them. If I remember correctly, my main problem was having to read the dialogues on the speech balloons, maybe because the font and the panels were too small. I much preferred reading illustrated novels.

However, some graphic novels and comics have been catching my eye since the beginning of last year, and I even ended up reading two in order to find out if my feelings towards this way of telling a story had changed. The first one I read was The Black Project by Gareth Brookes. Its main character is a really ingenious boy who wants to create his own girlfriend. I was a bit disappointed about the ending and the lack of colour, although it was rather funny at times. Afterwards, I decided to read The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg and quite liked it. This graphic novel about the power of love and storytelling made me appreciate much more the conveying of ideas through images combined with text and other visual information.

I discovered then that there are various genres of graphic novels, including fiction, non-fiction and anthologies, and that they differ from comic books, because these are periodicals, while the first ones are single works. I was also wrong to think that all pages featured the same amount of small squared panels with drawings and speech balloons inside. Many graphic novels and comics have drawings occupying full pages, or panels in a variety of sizes and formats. Furthermore, the illustrations can be much more appealing than I first thought. I’m not particularly tempted to read those with simple drawings in black and white. Instead, I prefer a wide-ranging palette of colours. Continue reading