The Translated Literature Book Tag

I’ve only done a couple of tags since starting this blog around three years ago. For no particular reason other than most of the times I can’t come up with answers to the questions, it’s usually not the type of content that I write. But when I was tagged by Callum to do the Translated Literature Book Tag, created by Diana, for once many books started to spring to mind to answer almost all of the queries.

In the context of this tag, I think it’s important to mention that I can read fluently in Portuguese and English. So, I now only read translations of books originally written in other languages besides those two. But, without further ado, let’s get into the questions.

 

  1. A translated novel you would recommend to everyone

No book can please everyone, so I can’t promise that you will all like my pick for this question. However, as Dear Mr. M by Herman Koch (translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett) mixes a crime story with musings on writing and fiction, I believe that it’s a book that readers of a wide variety of genres may appreciate. A murder is used to justify why reality and fiction have to differ. The story is told from various perspectives, and certain elements are introduced at specific moments to surprise the readers. Continue reading

Favourite Book Covers IV

As you can infer from the Roman numeral on the title, I love beautiful covers and like to share them with you. When it comes to books, there is just one thing more thrilling than a bookcase filled with them – a bookcase full of books with beautiful covers!

The fourth instalment of my favourite book covers features one book that I’m currently reading, two I’ve already read and one that I probably won’t start delving into for a few months. The title of the two books that are now safe on my read shelves link to the respective reviews, in case you want to know more about them. You can also see my other favourite book covers here.

 

Uma Vida à Sua Frente by Romain Gary

Cover design: Henrique Cayatte Atelier

Publisher: Sextante Editora Continue reading

‘The Life of Hunger’ by Amélie Nothomb

My rating: 4 stars

Amélie Nothomb is not merely the author of The Life of Hunger, she is also its narrator and main character. Nevertheless, this is not a non-fiction book. It is a fictional memoir which introduces a girl and a young woman permanently hungry, not only for food but for almost everything life can provide. As the daughter of a Belgian diplomat, she experienced various forms of hunger in different cities – Japan, Peking, New York, Bangladesh.

At the beginning of the book, Amélie remembers the moment when she received a parcel from a gentleman national of Vanuatu, a small and remote island, where the population has never known hunger. They’ve always had plenty of natural resources, more than enough for the short number of inhabitants. In this context, she defends that in the West we have the habit of overeating, because we see hunger in the streets. Also, we have a “keen” appetite, as we work in order to have money to buy things.

But the hunger Nothomb writes about is also connected with the aspiration of constantly having something present, and with the endless existence of something to do and to pursue. Since she was really young, she has always wanted more from games, books, toys, stories. She aspired to infinity, including from sugary things, although her mother tried to thwart her. Continue reading

Book Haul – January 2018

I decided to celebrate the arrival of 2018 by buying more books! And, more importantly, I badly needed three of them for my ‘EU still 28’ reading project. Two of the four books I recently acquired were written by authors I haven’t read before, while the other two are by an author whose work I’m already familiar with and that I tend to really enjoy.

The four newest additions to my shelves are:

 

The Life of Hunger by Amélie Nothomb

The Life of Hunger is the book I chose to read by a Belgian writer for the ‘EU still 28’ project. It’s a fictional memoir about the formative journeys of Nothomb’s youth, during which she suffered from acute anorexia. Continue reading